A Trio of Trailers and a Study in Contrasts

I’ve watched one Hunger Games and two Allegiant trailers today and wanted to make a few comments.  First up:  Mockingjay 2.

Wow!  I would say the Gamemakers have decided, why change something that’s working?  We see a lot of familiar faces and sweet scenes (Annie and Finnick, Katniss and Haymitch, Katniss and Prim and even a Katniss and hopefully de-hijacked Peeta) interspersed with a lot of action. That is to be expected from the invasion of the Capitol, and I love Finnick’s “Welcome to the 76th Hunger Games” line.  I didn’t see anything that jumped out and said, “Hey, that wasn’t in the book!”, except for Effie back in her froo-froo clothes, and she was such a welcome addition Erika+Bierman+Premiere+Lionsgate+Hunger+Games+31Qa872Vrywlto Mockingjay 1 that I’ll let that one pass.  The only think that surprised me was the apparently lush and manicured garden for Finnick and Annie’s wedding, a luxury I didn’t think district 13 could afford.  But I am crossing my fingers for something as good as Catching Fire and Mockingjay 1, and the filmmakers seemed to have decided sticking to the book is good.

Besides, the lovely Erika Bierman, who stole our hearts as President’s Snow’s Nameless Granddaughter in her two brief scenes in Catching Fire, was spotted on the red carpet at the Hollywood premiere.  Here’s hoping she can do more than unbraid her hair in this movie!

On to Allegiant, with two trailers, one a “teaser” (with a recap of the first two movies and one a new “official trailer.”

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A Hogwarts Psychology Professor Counts Down to Mockingjay! Part one of Hunger Games and PTSD

Tonight, I had the privilege of speaking on behalf of the Mary Baldwin Psi Chi psychology honor society about psychology in the Hunger Games series, in honor of the premiere of the last Hunger Games movie.  I have recorded the talk in three parts and I invite Hogpro readers to view and comment.

Part one focuses on the fear conditioning process that was used to hijack Peeta, and how it develops, in some patients–including several of our favorite Hunger Games characters–into post-traumatic stress disorder. Which characters would genuinely be diagnosed with PTSD?  Tune in and find out!

New Mockingjay Film Trailer: “For Prim”

If you can watch this without getting teary-eyed, seek psychiatric help immediately.

The Hunger Games: Shared text and First Family Favorite?

President Obama joked about the number of candidates jumping into the 2016 Presidential fray, remarking that there are almost enough for a Hunger Games.  This isn’t the first time he has referred to the popular franchise; he mentioned it back at the 2013 Thanksgiving turkey pardon. Barack-Obama-shopping-in--005And we know Sasha and/or Malia were reading it as far back as 2010. The question is, did their father borrow their copy, or glean his knowledge from the movies?

In any case, I think Trump and Christie get cast as the Careers.

Hunger Games: Dr. Amy H. Sturgis on the Dystopian Tradition

Wonderful opportunity for Hunger Games fans who are students — Dr Amy H. Sturgis, Potter Pundit and All-Around Literary Lioness, is offering a free lecture series this Spring! Read what she sent me about it:

On the weekends of March 28/29 and April 11/12, I’ll be offering a free interactive, multimedia lecture series – hotel accommodations and catering is included – for interested undergraduate and graduate students. It’s in Asheville, NC, a stone’s throw from where the Hunger Games film was shot. Students are responsible for travel there and back, but everything else is paid for.

The subject is “The Dystopian Tradition: What Worlds Gone Wrong Can Teach Us.”

Here’s the description:

Why did nearly 370 international organizations in the spring of 2014 use the term “Big Brother” from Nineteen Eighty-Four in their united call for global surveillance reform? Why did citizens in Thailand in the summer of 2014 adopt the three-finger salute from The Hunger Games to protest the repressive military coup in their country? Dystopian fiction and film pervades popular culture and conveys big ideas about issues of immediate political, economic, and social importance. This series will explore the warnings embedded in a century of great dystopian works with a focus on the lessons about human nature, free societies, and individual and community well-being that remain most relevant–and challenging–today.

For free registration, go to http://bit.ly/1t2Un5l